ADDN: Australasian Diabetes Data Network

There are more than 120,000 people living with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) in Australia, with over half of them children or young people. The clinical management of T1D involves the replacement of insulin by injection or infusion and self-monitoring of blood glucose to balance food intake and exercise. The overall aim of treatment is to normalise blood glucose levels to prevent the complications that develop when blood glucose levels are high whilst reducing the major side effect of insulin therapy, low blood glucose or ‘hypoglycaemia’.

Technological advances have enabled the establishment of clinical databases which capture health information about people with diabetes as they visit their diabetes clinic. The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN) has been built to enable de-identified health information from these clinical databases to be connected on a single platform, allowing the national surveillance of clinical outcomes and an opportunity for researchers to address important clinical questions in diabetes care. The aim of this research is to improve diabetes care practice and outcomes.

The major project goals of ADDN are to:

  • facilitate the nationwide recruitment of children, adolescents and adults with T1D to diabetes research studies,
  • monitor long term outcomes of diabetes interventions,
  • benchmark and provide actionable information to participating centres about their patient outcomes, and
  • provision epidemiological and clinical evidence in support of advocacy on behalf of people with diabetes.  

The ADDN project is a collaboration between the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group, the Australian Diabetes Society, the JDRF Australia Clinical Research Network, the University of Melbourne, and the many diabetes centres represented by the ADDN Study Group.

ADDN is supported by the Australian Type 1 Diabetes Research Network (T1D CRN), led by JDRF Australia, the recipient of Australian Government funding from the Australian Research Council (through a Special Research Initiative) and the Department of Health and Ageing.

Click here for more information about T1D CRN and the research they undertake.